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developer:sdksamples:pickobjects [2015/09/14]
127.0.0.1 external edit
developer:sdksamples:pickobjects [2015/11/12] (current)
sandy
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 ====== Picking Objects without CRhinoGetObject ====== ====== Picking Objects without CRhinoGetObject ======
 > **Summary:​** //​Demonstrates an alternate technique to picking objects without using CRhinoGetObject.//​ > **Summary:​** //​Demonstrates an alternate technique to picking objects without using CRhinoGetObject.//​
-> **NOTICE:** //The Rhino.NET SDK is deprecated in Rhino 5.  A similar example adapted for the new RhinoCommon SDK is available [[developer:​rhinocommonsamples:​pickobject|here]]//​+> **Notice:** //The Rhino.NET SDK is deprecated in Rhino 5.  A similar example adapted for the new RhinoCommon SDK is available [[developer:​rhinocommonsamples:​pickobject|here]]//​.
 =====Question===== =====Question=====
-If I already have a 3-D point, is there way to pick all of the objects that are underneath it?+If I already have a 3-D point, is there way to pick all the objects that are underneath it?
  
 =====Answer===== =====Answer=====
-You can use **CRhinoPickContext** to build your own object picker. For more details on **CRhinoPickContext**,​ see **rhinoSdkPick.h**. With the **CRhinoPickContext** class, you can define the rules for picking. For example, you can specify a picking style (point, window, crossing). You can also specify a filter so you only pick the types of objects you want. The most important part is to define a pick chord, which starts on near clipping plane and ends on far clipping plane.+You can use **CRhinoPickContext** to build your own object picker. For more details on **CRhinoPickContext**,​ see **rhinoSdkPick.h**. With the **CRhinoPickContext** class, you can define the rules for picking. For example, you can specify a picking style (point, window, crossing). You can also specify a filter so you only pick the types of objects you want. The most important part is to define a pick chord, which starts on **near clipping plane** and ends on **far clipping plane**.
  
-After you have created ​an CRhinoPickContext object and filled out is parameters, ​you then call **CRhinoDoc::​PickObjects**. This function goes through list of eligible objects and intersects them with the pick frustum. If they hit the frustum in an acceptable manner, the object is added to a pick list passed in by the caller.+After you have created ​the CRhinoPickContext object and filled out its parameters, call **CRhinoDoc::​PickObjects**. This function goes through ​the list of eligible objects and intersects them with the pick frustum. If they hit the frustum in an acceptable manner, the object is added to a pick list passed in by the caller.
  
 Here is a simple example of a function that might work for you: Here is a simple example of a function that might work for you:
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 </​code>​ </​code>​
-And, here is a sample of its usage:+And, here is a sample of its use:
  
 ===== C++ ===== ===== C++ =====
developer/sdksamples/pickobjects.txt ยท Last modified: 2015/11/12 by sandy