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rhino:mac:lionsaving [2015/09/30]
sandy
rhino:mac:lionsaving [2016/11/19] (current)
dan
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 ====== Everything you learned about saving files is wrong====== ​ ====== Everything you learned about saving files is wrong====== ​
  
-Apple has turned file saving on its head in OS X.  //You cannot save a file any more//​. ​ You need to be aware of this, or you may constantly cause yourself problems, not only in Rhino, but in other applications too.+Apple has turned file saving on its head in macOS.  //You cannot save a file any more//​. ​ You need to be aware of this, or you may constantly cause yourself problems, not only in Rhino, but in other applications too.
  
-This information applies to all applications that implement ​OS X's Auto Save and Versions.+This information applies to all applications that implement ​macOS's Auto Save and Versions.
  
 The following paragraph was in a recent Rhino for Mac release note. If you have not read the article, you should do that now. You should also read all the other articles referenced in the URL. The following paragraph was in a recent Rhino for Mac release note. If you have not read the article, you should do that now. You should also read all the other articles referenced in the URL.
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 On OS X prior to Lion and on Windows computers, the term autosaving meant //writing a single backup copy of your file somewhere else that you or the program can find later//​. ​ The term autosaving has meant this for a long time.  You were responsible for saving your file regularly, but Rhino and other programs created a backup file just in case you forgot to save your file. On OS X prior to Lion and on Windows computers, the term autosaving meant //writing a single backup copy of your file somewhere else that you or the program can find later//​. ​ The term autosaving has meant this for a long time.  You were responsible for saving your file regularly, but Rhino and other programs created a backup file just in case you forgot to save your file.
  
-In OS X, Apple unfortunately uses almost the same term, //Auto Save//, to describe something entirely different. ​ In OS X, Auto Save means //saving your file automatically//​ -- as in, overwriting your file automatically. ​ As in, there is no secret backup somewhere else. Your original file is getting overwritten. ​ All the time.+In macOS, Apple unfortunately uses almost the same term, //Auto Save//, to describe something entirely different. ​ In macOS, Auto Save means //saving your file automatically//​ -- as in, overwriting your file automatically. ​ As in, there is no secret backup somewhere else. Your original file is getting overwritten. ​ All the time.
  
 **How often is a file saved? **   //All the time.// **How often is a file saved? **   //All the time.//
  
 This is how Apple describes it: This is how Apple describes it:
-> Auto Save in OS X saves during pauses in your work and, if you work continuously,​ it will save after 5 minutes.+> Auto Save in macOS saves during pauses in your work and, if you work continuously,​ it will save after 5 minutes.
  
 Try the following experiment: Try the following experiment:
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 Within 10-20 seconds, the preview image of your file icon on the Desktop will change to match the Perspective view of your model. ​ Select the Rhino file on the Desktop and select **File > Get Info** in the Finder menu. You will see that the file modification date has changed. ​ Your file has been updated on the disk. Within 10-20 seconds, the preview image of your file icon on the Desktop will change to match the Perspective view of your model. ​ Select the Rhino file on the Desktop and select **File > Get Info** in the Finder menu. You will see that the file modification date has changed. ​ Your file has been updated on the disk.
  
-The same thing happens when you switch from Rhino to another application.  ​OS X Auto Save will save your file immediately when you switch to another application. ​ In the experiment above, instead of doing nothing for 10-20 seconds, switch to the Finder. ​ Your file is immediately updated.+The same thing happens when you switch from Rhino to another application.  ​macOS Auto Save will save your file immediately when you switch to another application. ​ In the experiment above, instead of doing nothing for 10-20 seconds, switch to the Finder. ​ Your file is immediately updated.
  
 Also, your model is saved when you close the model window or quit Rhino. ​ You will never see a //Do you want to save your changes?// dialog. Also, your model is saved when you close the model window or quit Rhino. ​ You will never see a //Do you want to save your changes?// dialog.
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 Every time you type Command-S, you add another Version to your file.  Pressing Command-S a lot means you create a //lot// of versions of your file. You probably do not need or want all those distinct backups in the future. ​ You should instead stop typing Command-S all the time if you just want to save your model. ​ This is no longer necessary. ​ The system is already saving your model for you. Every time you type Command-S, you add another Version to your file.  Pressing Command-S a lot means you create a //lot// of versions of your file. You probably do not need or want all those distinct backups in the future. ​ You should instead stop typing Command-S all the time if you just want to save your model. ​ This is no longer necessary. ​ The system is already saving your model for you.
  
-The system also provides a Time Machine-like interface to look at these saved versions. ​ Navigate to the **File** > **Revert To** menu.  Choose **Browse all versions** and OS X will present you with a browser to view all the past saved versions. ​ Command-S does not save your file to disk. Instead, it is doing much more work by creating a backup, a duplicate, and browsable version of your file.+The system also provides a Time Machine-like interface to look at these saved versions. ​ Navigate to the **File** > **Revert To** menu.  Choose **Browse all versions** and macOS will present you with a browser to view all the past saved versions. ​ Command-S does not save your file to disk. Instead, it is doing much more work by creating a backup, a duplicate, and browsable version of your file.
  
 **New models** **New models**
rhino/mac/lionsaving.txt ยท Last modified: 2016/11/19 by dan