Site Tools


Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
rhino:faqclosedsolids [2016/04/29]
sandy
rhino:faqclosedsolids [2016/05/03] (current)
sandy
Line 9: Line 9:
 //<color darkslateblue>​Mitch says: The official terminology for a closed solid in Rhino is a **closed polysurface**.</​color>//​ //<color darkslateblue>​Mitch says: The official terminology for a closed solid in Rhino is a **closed polysurface**.</​color>//​
  
-A solid has **no naked edges**. That's a concise definition. Another way to understand a solid is to see it as a balloon. If there is even a pin prick size hole, it will deflate. Thus it is not air/​watertight,​ not volumetric. A solid is a volume. A solid **is** ​its outer surfaces, once they are completely joined.+A solid has **no naked edges**. That's a concise definition. Another way to understand a solid is to see it as a balloon. If there is even a pin prick size hole, it will deflate. Thus it is not air/​watertight,​ not volumetric. A solid is a volume. A solid __is__ ​its outer surfaces, once they are completely joined.
  
 //<color green>JB says: Use the **ShowEdges** command with the display set to "naked edges" to find the unjoined edges.</​color>//​ //<color green>JB says: Use the **ShowEdges** command with the display set to "naked edges" to find the unjoined edges.</​color>//​
Line 15: Line 15:
 The term "​solids"​ seems to confuse a lot of people and there are often discussions about it, in particular with relation to getting watertight solids for rapid prototyping. ​ Some people worry that if you slice a solid in Rhino, you do not get surface planes or salami slices, but just an outer boundary curve at each slice. ​ **This is normal.** The rapid prototyping software/​machine fills these slices in for you.  Also remember, that it is not the Rhino [[rhino:​nurbs|NURBS]] object that is being sliced by the rapid prototyping process, but a **mesh** in the form of your object, via an STL file.  And guess what?  Meshes are no more solid than Rhino NURBS objects... ​ When you slice them, you still get just boundary curves. The term "​solids"​ seems to confuse a lot of people and there are often discussions about it, in particular with relation to getting watertight solids for rapid prototyping. ​ Some people worry that if you slice a solid in Rhino, you do not get surface planes or salami slices, but just an outer boundary curve at each slice. ​ **This is normal.** The rapid prototyping software/​machine fills these slices in for you.  Also remember, that it is not the Rhino [[rhino:​nurbs|NURBS]] object that is being sliced by the rapid prototyping process, but a **mesh** in the form of your object, via an STL file.  And guess what?  Meshes are no more solid than Rhino NURBS objects... ​ When you slice them, you still get just boundary curves.
  
-**[[rhino:​soliddiscussion|Discussion of the concept of Solids ​(culled from newsgroup posts).]]**+**[[rhino:​soliddiscussion|Discussion of the concept of solids ​(culled from newsgroup posts).]]**
  
 =====Tolerances play a role in creating closed volumes===== =====Tolerances play a role in creating closed volumes=====
rhino/faqclosedsolids.txt ยท Last modified: 2016/05/03 by sandy