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rhino:meshfaqdetails [2016/03/15]
sandy
rhino:meshfaqdetails [2016/03/15] (current)
sandy
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 >//​Unraveling the mysteries of Rhino mesh settings --  Solutions to common meshing problems.// >//​Unraveling the mysteries of Rhino mesh settings --  Solutions to common meshing problems.//
  
-<color slategray>​ **Note:** This page has some detailed info on how meshing works in Rhino. It is a compilation of facts and experiences from the support forums, McNeel developers, and Rhino power users. ​ I have updated it somewhat for Rhino 5.  --Mitch 16.01.2013 </​color>​+<color slategray>​ **Note:** This page has detailed info on how meshing works in Rhino. It is a compilation of facts and experiences from the support forums, McNeel developers, and Rhino power users. ​ I have updated it somewhat for Rhino 5.  --Mitch 16.01.2013 </​color>​
  
 //​**[[http://​www.hydraulicdesign.net/​meshes.htm|See also James Carruthers'​ excellent explanation of display mesh problems.]]**//​ //​**[[http://​www.hydraulicdesign.net/​meshes.htm|See also James Carruthers'​ excellent explanation of display mesh problems.]]**//​
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 All these can usually be traced back to some problem with the meshing of the model or your mesh settings in general...\\  ​ All these can usually be traced back to some problem with the meshing of the model or your mesh settings in general...\\  ​
  
-//Mesh, you say?// ​ //I didn't make any meshes, all I made was NURBS surfaces.//  ​+<color darkslateblue>​**//Mesh, you say?// ​ //I didn't make any meshes, all I made was NURBS surfaces.//**</​color> ​ 
  
 Well, you may not know it, but you created some meshes without realizing it ...  //read on//. Well, you may not know it, but you created some meshes without realizing it ...  //read on//.
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 The same meshing engine in Rhino is used in both the creation of analysis meshes for the functions like Draft Analysis and Curvature Analysis, EMap and by the **Mesh** command (//Tools > Polygon Mesh > From NURBS Object//), which creates a real mesh object directly from a NURBS object. The same meshing engine in Rhino is used in both the creation of analysis meshes for the functions like Draft Analysis and Curvature Analysis, EMap and by the **Mesh** command (//Tools > Polygon Mesh > From NURBS Object//), which creates a real mesh object directly from a NURBS object.
  
-Exporting from Rhino with certain polygon-based formats (such as .stl) will also create mesh objects (in the exported file). ​ Although you can't edit these in the original Rhino file, you can control how they are created with the same group of mesh density settings ​to control.+Exporting from Rhino with certain polygon-based formats (such as .stl) will also create mesh objects (in the exported file). ​ Although you can't edit these in the original Rhino file, you can control how they are created with the same group of mesh density settings.
  
 The functions that create real, editable meshes like **Mesh** and **Export** (.stl) are important in many applications,​ as other downstream programs or processes often need polygon mesh objects to work with. The functions that create real, editable meshes like **Mesh** and **Export** (.stl) are important in many applications,​ as other downstream programs or processes often need polygon mesh objects to work with.
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 =====The different mesh types===== =====The different mesh types=====
  
-  * **Render meshes** are created on [[rhino:​nurbs|NURBS]] surfaces and polysurfaces for visualization purposes when using Shaded or Rendered Viewports. ​ They are not directly user accessible or editable. They stay attached to the NURBS object they were created from. You can delete ​them by using the **ClearAllMeshes** command, and regenerate them by using the **RefreshShade** command or by changing the settings (at //File > Properties > Mesh//) (which forces a global regeneration of all render meshes). As of V4, you can also transform the render mesh into a real editable mesh object using the command **ExtractRenderMesh**.+  * **Render meshes** are created on [[rhino:​nurbs|NURBS]] surfaces and polysurfaces for visualization purposes when using Shaded or Rendered Viewports. ​ They are not directly user accessible or editable. They stay attached to the NURBS object they were created from. Delete ​them by using the **ClearAllMeshes** command, and regenerate them by using the **RefreshShade** command or by changing the settings (at //File > Properties > Mesh//) (which forces a global regeneration of all render meshes). As of V4, you can also transform the render mesh into a real editable mesh object using the command **ExtractRenderMesh**.
  
  
-  * **Analysis meshes** are like the render meshes in that they are not normally editable or separable from their NURBS object. ​ They simply have another set of controls and exist separately from the render meshes. ​ You //can// see them temporarily,​ however, when you use the **adjust mesh** button or the **preview** button in the settings panel on the dialog boxes for the Analysis commands. ​ In Rhino 5, like with render meshes above,you can transform an analysis mesh into a real mesh object with the command **ExtractAnalysisMesh**.+  * **Analysis meshes** are like the render meshes in that they are not normally editable or separable from their NURBS object. ​ They simply have another set of controls and exist separately from the render meshes. ​ You //can// see them temporarily,​ however, when you use the adjust mesh button or the preview button in the settings panel on the dialog boxes for the Analysis commands. ​ In Rhino 5, like with render meshes above, you can transform an analysis mesh into a real mesh object with the command **ExtractAnalysisMesh**.
  
  
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 =====The mesh settings dialogs===== =====The mesh settings dialogs=====
 +
 <color darkslateblue>​**//​Why do we need mesh settings anyway? ​ Isn't Rhino intelligent enough to figure all this stuff out without my having to tell it what to do?//​**</​color>​ <color darkslateblue>​**//​Why do we need mesh settings anyway? ​ Isn't Rhino intelligent enough to figure all this stuff out without my having to tell it what to do?//​**</​color>​
  
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 <color darkslateblue>​**//​OK then, why don't I just mesh everything very finely and with high resolution? Won't that solve my problem and let me forget about it??//​**</​color>​ <color darkslateblue>​**//​OK then, why don't I just mesh everything very finely and with high resolution? Won't that solve my problem and let me forget about it??//​**</​color>​
  
-<color darkslategray>​**//​Actually not//​**</​color> ​--- it will probably make things worse. ​ Meshes are a bit like pixels in an image - the more pixels //(mesh faces)// you have, the finer the image //(model)// resolution is, but more data is needed to describe the image //​(model)//​. ​ The data set can become huge, and considering that this data also needs to be dynamic //(you want to rotate your shaded model and look at it, right?)// the ability of your computer to process this data in realtime quickly reaches its limit.+<color darkslategray>​**//​Actually not//​**</​color>​ -- it will probably make things worse. ​ Meshes are a bit like pixels in an image -- the more pixels //(mesh faces)// you have, the finer the image //(model)// resolution is, but more data is needed to describe the image //​(model)//​. ​ The data set can become huge, and considering that this data also needs to be dynamic //(you want to rotate your shaded model and look at it, right?)// the ability of your computer to process this data in realtime quickly reaches its limit.
  
-So meshing is a balancing act.  The idea is to use the //least// number of mesh faces you need to have adequate resolution for your job - and no more.  To do that in Rhino requires some understanding of how the meshing system works. ​ //​That'​s why you're here.// :-)+So meshing is a balancing act.  The idea is to use the //least// number of mesh faces you need to have adequate resolution for your job -- and no more.  To do that in Rhino requires some understanding of how the meshing system works. ​ //​That'​s why you're here.// :-)
  
 ====The Controls==== ====The Controls====
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   * **Jagged & Faster** is the default for render meshes --- fine for quick visualization,​ but not very good for anything else.   * **Jagged & Faster** is the default for render meshes --- fine for quick visualization,​ but not very good for anything else.
  
-  * **Smooth & Slower** //​theoretically//​ offers better resolution at the expense of longer meshing times. In practice, even though it does take longer, frankly, it may still leave visible gaps where you don't want them, so try the custom settings instead.+  * **Smooth & Slower** //​theoretically//​ offers better resolution at the expense of longer meshing times. In practice, even though it does take longer, frankly, it may still leave visible gaps where you don't want them, so you may try the custom settings instead.
  
   * **Custom** offers the most flexibility in tailoring the mesh settings, at the expense of being a bit complex to understand and set up.    * **Custom** offers the most flexibility in tailoring the mesh settings, at the expense of being a bit complex to understand and set up. 
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rhino/meshfaqdetails.txt ยท Last modified: 2016/03/15 by sandy