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rhino:checkreducefilesize [2017/10/05]
mitch
rhino:checkreducefilesize [2017/10/19] (current)
mitch
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   * **Display meshes**: If you suspect your display mesh settings are causing an inflated file size, there are several things to try.  You can try using the command **_SaveSmall**,​ which will save the file without the render meshes. Check the freshly saved file size, if it has dramatically decreased, that was at least part of your problem. ​ If you want to preserve the original, you can also use **_SaveAs** with a different name and check the box "Save small" in the dialog.   * **Display meshes**: If you suspect your display mesh settings are causing an inflated file size, there are several things to try.  You can try using the command **_SaveSmall**,​ which will save the file without the render meshes. Check the freshly saved file size, if it has dramatically decreased, that was at least part of your problem. ​ If you want to preserve the original, you can also use **_SaveAs** with a different name and check the box "Save small" in the dialog.
  
-  * **Materials/Bitmaps (images)**: If the bitmap and/​or ​materials table contain ​large entries, you could first try the **_Purge** command with **_Materials=_Yes**. ​ That should purge any unused materials, see if that helps. ​ If not, see the next section...+  * **Materials**:​ If the materials table contains ​large entries, you could first try the **_Purge** command with **_Materials=_Yes**. ​ That should purge any unused materials, see if that helps. ​ If not, see the Plug-in data section ​below... 
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 +  * **Bitmaps (images)**: If the bitmap table contains large entries, it could be one of several things. ​ Picture(frame) images, background bitmaps and images applied as textures are all stored in the Bitmap Table. ​ You might see if you have any unused textures that are somehow stuck in the file and eliminate them, and remove any Picture(frame) elements you no longer need.  However, that might not always fix things, sometimes bitmap images get "​stuck"​ in the file even when the object that carried them such as a Picture(frame) is deleted. ​ In that case, you may have to "go nuclear"​ and purge the bitmap table. ​ In Rhino V5, there is a test command to do this - **TestPurgeBitmapTable** - you have to type it all out, it does not autocomplete. ​ BEWARE, this will remove //ALL// bitmaps from the document, including some you might still need, so use this command carefully...
  
   * **Plug-in data**: Data created by Rhino plug-ins stays in the file //even if the Rhino instance opening the file doesn'​t have the appropriate plug-in(s) installed// - you can't access it, but it's still there and doesn'​t get purged when re-saving the file.  That's actually a good thing.\\ \\ However, perhaps you got a file back from your render person with all their custom materials in it, or from your modelmaker with all their CAM toolpaths in it; you don't want any of that stuff anymore anyway and would like to reduce the file size if possible.\\ \\ The way to do that is to use **_-SaveAs** (with the dash!); on the command line you will see an entry **_SavePlugInData**. ​ Set that to **_No** and save.  //​**Warning:​** this will nuke all data from all plug-ins (currently) so make sure you are really not going to need this stuff again!// ​ Good idea to make a copy just in case.\\ \\ Using the above procedure to remove plug-in data can also solve some of the problems with data from some "​unknown source"​ that is "​stuck"​ in the file that you haven'​t been able to remove any other way.   * **Plug-in data**: Data created by Rhino plug-ins stays in the file //even if the Rhino instance opening the file doesn'​t have the appropriate plug-in(s) installed// - you can't access it, but it's still there and doesn'​t get purged when re-saving the file.  That's actually a good thing.\\ \\ However, perhaps you got a file back from your render person with all their custom materials in it, or from your modelmaker with all their CAM toolpaths in it; you don't want any of that stuff anymore anyway and would like to reduce the file size if possible.\\ \\ The way to do that is to use **_-SaveAs** (with the dash!); on the command line you will see an entry **_SavePlugInData**. ​ Set that to **_No** and save.  //​**Warning:​** this will nuke all data from all plug-ins (currently) so make sure you are really not going to need this stuff again!// ​ Good idea to make a copy just in case.\\ \\ Using the above procedure to remove plug-in data can also solve some of the problems with data from some "​unknown source"​ that is "​stuck"​ in the file that you haven'​t been able to remove any other way.
  
  
-  * **Massive amounts of geometry in the file**: ​ As said earlier, assuming the file has already been created, there is not all that much you can do about reducing the file size in this case - Rhino needs that space to correctly describe all the objects. ​ If you need to send the file to someone, zipping it often helps reduce Rhino file size significantly. ​ If you haven'​t already created the file, and you will be having lots of identical objects in it, using **blocks** may help keep file size down.  See the Rhino Help for more on using blocks.+  * **Massive amounts of geometry in the file**: ​ As said earlier, assuming the file has already been created, there is not all that much you can do about reducing the file size in this case - Rhino needs that space to correctly describe all the objects. ​ If you need to send the file to someone, zipping it often helps reduce Rhino file size significantly. ​ If you haven'​t already created the file, and you will be having lots of identical objects in it, using **blocks** may help keep file size down.  See the Rhino Help for more on using blocks.\\ \\ **If your object table memory size is very large and you really believe it shouldn'​t be,** then you will have to go on a search for the object or objects that are causing the file size.  Check first if anything is hidden or on an off layer that might be causing the problem. ​ Another thing might be one or more huge surfaces (with thousands of control points) that have been trimmed down to a small size.  you may think they don't take any space, but Rhino stores the original (untrimmed) definition of the surface, so an apparently small surface may indeed take a lot of memory. ​ The command **_ShrinkTrimmedSrf** will remove the unneeded part of these surfaces.
  
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-==(first draft, ​comments welcome...)==+==(comments welcome...)==
  
  
rhino/checkreducefilesize.txt · Last modified: 2017/10/19 by mitch